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Dictionaries :: Gilead

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Easton's Bible Dictionary

Gilead:

hill of testimony, (Gen 31:21), a mountainous region east of Jordan. From its mountainous character it is called "the mount of Gilead" (Gen 31:25). It is called also "the land of Gilead" (Num 32:1), and sometimes simply "Gilead" (Psa 60:7; Gen 37:25). It comprised the possessions of the tribes of Gad and Reuben and the south part of Manasseh (Deu 3:13; Num 32:40). It was bounded on the north by Bashan, and on the south by Moab and Ammon (Gen 31:21; Deu 3:12-17). "Half Gilead" was possessed by Sihon, and the other half, separated from it by the river Jabbok, by Og, king of Bashan. The deep ravine of the river Hieromax (the modern Sheriat el-Mandhur) separated Bashan from Gilead, which was about 60 miles in length and 20 in breadth, extending from near the south end of the Lake of Gennesaret to the north end of the Dead Sea. Abarim, Pisgah, Nebo, and Peor are its mountains mentioned in Scripture.

Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary

Gilead:

the heap or mass of testimony

Smith's Bible Dictionary

Gilead:

(rocky region).

(1.) A mountainous region bounded on the west by the Jordan, on the north by Bashan, on the east by the Arabian plateau, and on the south by Moab and Ammon (Genesis 31:21; 3:12-17). It is sometimes called "Mount Gilead," (Genesis 31:25) sometimes "the land of Gilead," (Numbers 32:1) and sometimes simply "Gilead." (Psalm 60:7; Genesis 37:25). The name Gilead, as is usual in Palestine, describes the physical aspect of the country: it signifies "a hard rocky region." The mountains of Gilead, including Pisgah, Abarim and Peor, have a real elevation of from 2,000 to 3,000 feet; but their apparent elevation on the western side is much greater, owing to the depression of the Jordan valley, which averages about 3,000 feet. Their outline is singularly uniform, resembling a massive wall running along the horizon. Gilead was specially noted for its balm collected from "balm of Gilead" trees, and worth twice its weight in silver.

(2.) Possibly the name of a mountain west of the Jordan, near Jezreel (Judges 7:3). We are inclined, however, to think that the true reading in this place should be GILBOA (SEE [GILBOA].)

(3.) Son of Machir, grandson of Manasseh (Numbers 26:29, 30).

(4.) The father of Jephthah (Judges 11:1-2).

CONTENT DISCLAIMER:

The Blue Letter Bible ministry and the BLB Institute hold to the historical, conservative Christian faith, which includes a firm belief in the inerrancy of Scripture. Since the text and audio content provided by BLB represent a range of evangelical traditions, all of the ideas and principles conveyed in the resource materials are not necessarily affirmed, in total, by this ministry.