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Dictionaries :: Steel

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Easton's Bible Dictionary

Steel:

The "bow of steel" in (A.V.) 2Sa 22:35; Job 20:24; Psa 18:34 is in the Revised Version "bow of brass" (Heb. kesheth-nehushah). In Jer 15:12 the same word is used, and is also rendered in the Revised Version "brass." But more correctly it is copper (q.v.), as brass in the ordinary sense of the word (an alloy of copper and zinc) was not known to the ancients.

International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia

Steel:

stel: the Revised Version (British and American) substitutes "brass" for "steel" in 2Sa 22:35; Job 20:24; Ps 18:34; Jer 15:12, and "steel" for "torches" in Na 2:3.

See BRASS

Smith's Bible Dictionary

Steel:

In all cases were the word "steel" occurs in the Authorized Version the true rendering of the Hebrew is "copper." Whether the ancient Hebrews were acquainted with steel is not perfectly certain. It has been inferred from a passage in Jeremiah 15:12 that the "iron from the north" there spoken of denoted a superior kind of metal, hardened in an unusual manner, like the steel obtained from the Chalybes of the Pontus, the iron smiths of the ancient world. The hardening of iron for cutting instruments was practiced in Pontus, Lydia and Laconia. There is, however, a word in Hebrew, paldah, which occurs only in Nahum 2:3 and is there rendered "torches," but which most probably denotes steel or hardened iron, and refers to the flashing scythes of the Assyrian chariots. Steel appears to have been known to the Egyptians. The steel weapons in the tomb of Rameses III., says Wilkinson, are painted blue, the bronze red.

CONTENT DISCLAIMER:

The Blue Letter Bible ministry and the BLB Institute hold to the historical, conservative Christian faith, which includes a firm belief in the inerrancy of Scripture. Since the text and audio content provided by BLB represent a range of evangelical traditions, all of the ideas and principles conveyed in the resource materials are not necessarily affirmed, in total, by this ministry.