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Dictionaries :: Sandal

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International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia

Sandal:

san'-dal.

See DRESS

See SHOE

See SHOE-LATCHET

Vine's Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words
1 Strong's Number: g4547 Greek: sandalion

Sandal:

a diminutive of sandalon, probably a Persian word, Mar 6:9; Act 12:8. The "sandal" is usually had a wooden sole bound on by straps round the instep and ankle.

Smith's Bible Dictionary

Sandal:

was the article ordinarily used by the Hebrews for protecting the feet. It consisted simply of a sole attached to the foot by thongs. We have express notice of the thong (Authorized Version "shoe latchet") in several passages, notably (Genesis 14:23; Isaiah 5:27; Mark 1:7). Sandals were worn by all classes of society in Palestine, even by the very poor; and both the sandal and the thong or shoe‐latchet were so cheap and common that they passed into a proverb for the most insignificant thing (Genesis 14:23; Ecclesiasticus 46:13). They were dispensed with in‐doors, and were only put on by persons about to undertake some business away from their homes. During mealtimes the feet were uncovered (Luke 7:38; John 13:5-6). It was a mark of reverence to cast off the shoes in approaching a place or person of eminent sanctity (Exodus 3:5; Joshua 5:15). It was also an indication of violent emotion, or of mourning, if a person appeared barefoot in public (2 Samuel 15:30). To carry or to unloose a person's sandal was a menial office, betokening great inferiority on the part of the person performing it (Matthew 3:11).

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The Blue Letter Bible ministry and the BLB Institute hold to the historical, conservative Christian faith, which includes a firm belief in the inerrancy of Scripture. Since the text and audio content provided by BLB represent a range of evangelical traditions, all of the ideas and principles conveyed in the resource materials are not necessarily affirmed, in total, by this ministry.