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Dr. J. Vernon McGee :: Notes for Titus

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TITUS


WRITER: Paul

DATE: A.D. 64-67 (See notes on 1 Timothy.)

CONTRAST: While little is known of either Timothy or Titus, there seems to have been quite a contrast between them. Titus seems to have been a stronger man, both physically and spiritually, since Paul expresses less concern for his welfare. Titus was probably more mature and possessed a virile personality. Timothy was a Jew who was circumcised by Paul, but Titus was a Gentile, and Paul seems to have refused to circumcise him (Galatians 2:3). Paul circumcised one young preacher and refused to circumcise the other. Surely there is no rule that can be drawn from this other than “in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth anything, nor uncircumcision, but a new creature” (Galatians 6:15).

THE NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH: Here is a fine picture of the New Testament church in its full-orbed realization in the community as an organization. Many boast today that they belong to a New Testament church. In this epistle is found the measuring rod. The ideal church is one that has an orderly organization, is sound in doctrine, pure in life, and “ready to every good work” (Titus 3:1).

THE RETURN OF CHRIST: In the first two epistles that Paul wrote (1 and 2 Thessalonians), the return of Christ is a great pulsing hope. This has led some critics to say that Paul believed this only when he was young and that he changed when he became more mature. However, in this epistle to Titus, one of his last, the blessed hope still possesses the soul of this intrepid pioneer of faith, “Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour, Jesus Christ” (Titus 2:13). The word for “looking” has the root meaning of entertaining. This is the hope that occupied the guest chamber in the heart of Paul during all of his life, beginning at the Damascus Road and going on to the Appian Way.

Outline for 2 Timothy ← Prior Section
Outline for Titus Next Section →
Notes for 2 Timothy ← Prior Book
Notes for Philemon Next Book →
CONTENT DISCLAIMER:

The Blue Letter Bible ministry and the BLB Institute hold to the historical, conservative Christian faith, which includes a firm belief in the inerrancy of Scripture. Since the text and audio content provided by BLB represent a range of evangelical traditions, all of the ideas and principles conveyed in the resource materials are not necessarily affirmed, in total, by this ministry.