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Study Resources :: Dictionaries :: Holy Place

Dictionaries :: Holy Place

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Below are articles from the following 3 dictionaries:
Easton's Bible Dictionary

Holy Place:

one of the two portions into which the tabernacle was divided (Exd 26:31; 37:17-25; Hbr 9:2). It was 20 cubits long and 10 in height and breadth. It was illuminated by the golden candlestick, as it had no opening to admit the light. It contained the table of showbread (Exd 25:23-29) and the golden altar of incense (30:1-11). It was divided from the holy of holies by a veil of the most costly materials and the brightest colours.

The arrangement of the temple (q.v.) was the same in this respect. In it the walls of hewn stone were wainscotted with cedar and overlaid with gold, and adorned with beautiful carvings. It was entered from the porch by folding doors overlaid with gold and richly embossed. Outside the holy place stood the great tank or "sea" of molten brass, supported by twelve oxen, three turned each way, capable of containing two thousand baths of water. Besides this there were ten lavers and the brazen altar of burnt sacrifice.

International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia

Holy Place:

(ha-qodhesh, Ex 26:33, ha-hekhal, 1Ki 6:17, etc.; he prote skene, Heb 9:6 f):

1. The Terms:

The tabernacle consisted of two divisions to which a graduated scale of holiness is attached: "The veil shall separate unto you between the holy place and the most holy" (Ex 26:33). This distinction was never abrogated. In the Epistle to the Hebrews these divisions are called the "first" and "second" tabernacles (Heb 9:6 f). The term "holy place" is not indeed confined to the outer chamber of the sanctuary; in Le 6:16, it is applied to "the court of the tent of meeting." But the other is its technical use. In Solomon's temple we have a different usage. The word hekhal, "temple," is not at first applied, as after, to the whole building, but is the designation specifically of the holy place, in distinction from the debhir, or "oracle" (compare 1Ki 6:3,5,16,17,33, etc.; so in Eze 41:1,2,4, etc.). The wider usage is later (compare 2Ki 11:10,11,13, etc.).

2. Size of the Holy Place:

The size of the holy place differed at different times. The holy place of the tabernacle was 20 cubits long by 10 broad and 10 high (30 x 15 x 15 ft.); that of Solomon's temple was twice this in length and breadth-40 by 20 cubits; but it is contended by many (Bahr, etc.) that in height it was the full internal height of the building-30 cubits; the Herodian temple has the same dimensions of length and breadth, but Josephus and Middoth give largely increased, though differing, numbers for the height (see TEMPLE, HEROD'S).

3. Contents of Holy Place:

The contents of the holy place were from the beginning ordered to be these (Ex 25:23 ff; 30:1-10): the altar of incense, a golden candlestick (in Solomon's temple increased to ten, 1Ki 7:49), and a table of showbread (likewise increased to ten, 2Ch 4:8). For the construction, position, history and uses of these objects, see TABERNACLE; TEMPLE, and articles under the several headings. This, as shown by Josephus and by the sculptures on the Arch of Titus, continued to be the furniture of the holy place till the end.

4. Symbolism:

As the outer division of the sanctuary, into which, as yet, not the people, but only their representatives in the priesthood, were admitted while yet the symbols of the people's consecrated life (prayer, light, thanksgiving) were found in it, the holy place may be said to represent the people's relation to God in the earthly life, as the holy of holies represented God's relation to the people in a perfected communion. In the Epistle to the Hebrews, the holy place is not largely dwelt on as compared with the court in which the perfect sacrifice was offered, and the holiest of all into which Christ has now entered (Christ passes "through" the tabernacle into the holiest, 9:11). It pertains, however, evidently to the earthly sphere of Christ's manifestation, even as earth is the present scene of the church's fellowship. Through earth, by the way which Christ has opened up, the believer, already in spirit, finally in fact, passes with Him into the holiest (Heb 10:19; compare Heb 9:8; see Westcott, Hebrews, 233 ff).

Written by W. Shaw Caldecott

CONTENT DISCLAIMER:

The Blue Letter Bible ministry and the BLB Institute hold to the historical, conservative Christian faith, which includes a firm belief in the inerrancy of Scripture. Since the text and audio content provided by BLB represent a range of evangelical traditions, all of the ideas and principles conveyed in the resource materials are not necessarily affirmed, in total, by this ministry.


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