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Dictionaries :: Pashur

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Easton's Bible Dictionary

Pashur:

release. (1.) The son of Immer (Neh 10:3; 12:2), the head of one of the priestly courses, was "chief governor [Heb. paqid nagid, meaning "deputy governor"] of the temple" (Jer 20:1,2). At this time the nagid, or "governor," of the temple was Seraiah the high priest (1Ch 6:14), and Pashur was his paqid, or "deputy." Enraged at the plainness with which Jeremiah uttered his solemn warnings of coming judgements, because of the abounding iniquity of the times, Pashur ordered the temple police to seize him, and after inflicting on him corporal punishment (Deu 25:3; 2Cr 11:24), to put him in the stocks in the high gate of Benjamin, where he remained all night. On being set free in the morning, Jeremiah went to Pashur (Jer 20:3,5), and announced to him that God had changed his name to Magor-missabib, i.e., "terror on every side." The punishment that fell upon him was probably remorse, when he saw the ruin he had brought upon his country by advising a close alliance with Egypt in opposition to the counsels of Jeremiah (Jer 20:4-6). He was carried captive to Babylon, and died there.

(2.) A priest sent by king Zedekiah to Jeremiah to inquire of the Lord (1Ch 24:9; Jer 21:1; 38:1-6). He advised that the prophet should be put to death.

(3.) The father of Gedaliah. He was probably the same as (1).

Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary

Pashur:

that extends or multiplies the hole; whiteness

Smith's Bible Dictionary

Pashur:

(freedom).

(1.) One of the families of priests of the chief house of Malchijah (1 Chronicles 9:12; 24:9; Nehemiah 11:12; Jeremiah 21:1; 38:1). In the time of Nehemiah this family appears to have become a chief house, and its head the head of a course (Ezra 2:38; Nehemiah 7:41; 10:3). The individual from whom the family was named was probably Pushur the son of Malchiah, who in the reign of Zedekiah was one of the chief princes of the court (Jeremiah 38:1). (B.C. 607) He was sent, with others, by Zedekiah to Jeremiah at the time when Nebuchadnezzar was preparing his attack upon Jerusalem (Jeremiah 21:1). … Again somewhat later Pashur joined with several other chief men in petitioning the king that Jeremiah might be put to death as a traitor (Jeremiah 38:4).

(2.) Another person of this name, also a priest, and "chief governor of the house of the Lord," is mentioned in Jeremiah 20:1. He is described as "the son of Immer." (1 Chronicles 24:14) probably the same as Amariah. (Nehemiah 10:3; 12:2 etc.). SEE [AMARIAH, 4.]. In the reign of Jehoiakim he showed himself as hostile to Jeremiah as his namesake the son of Malchiah did afterward, and put him in the stocks by the gate of Benjamin. For this indignity to God's prophet Pashur was told by Jeremiah that his name was changed to Magor‐missabib (terror on every side) and that he and all his house should be carried captives to Babylon and there die (Jeremiah 20:1-6). (B.C. 589)

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The Blue Letter Bible ministry and the BLB Institute hold to the historical, conservative Christian faith, which includes a firm belief in the inerrancy of Scripture. Since the text and audio content provided by BLB represent a range of evangelical traditions, all of the ideas and principles conveyed in the resource materials are not necessarily affirmed, in total, by this ministry.