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Dictionaries :: Geshur

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Easton's Bible Dictionary

Geshur:

bridge, the name of a district or principality of Syria near Gilead, between Mount Hermon and the Lake of Tiberias (2Sa 15:8; 1Ch 2:23). The Geshurites probably inhabited the rocky fastness of Argob, the modern Lejah, in the north-east corner of Bashan. In the time of David it was ruled by Talmai, whose daughter he married, and who was the mother of Absalom, who fled to Geshur after the murder of Amnon (2Sa 13:37).

Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary

Geshur:

Geshuri, sight of the valley; a walled valley

International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia

Geshur:

ge'-shur (geshur, "bridge"): An Aramean kingdom (2Sa 15:8) of no great size which lay probably to the South of Maacah, and formed with it the western boundary of the land of Bashan (De 3:14; Jos 12:5; 13:11). The territory of these two probably corresponded roughly with modern Jaulan. It may not have reached quite to the Jordan on the West; in which case the Geshurites literally dwelt "in the midst" of Israel (Jos 13:13), since they were not expatriated by the half-tribe of Manasseh, and they retained their independence. David married Maacah, daughter of Talmai, king of Geshur, who became the mother of Absalom and Tamar (2Sa 3:3). To Talmai Absalom fled for safety after the murder of Amnon (2Sa 13:37 f), and thence Joab brought him back to Jerusalem (2Sa 14:23). The Geshurites and Aram are said to have taken the cities of Jair-i.e. Havvoth-jair-which lay in the land of Gilead (1Ch 2:23). It is possible that "Geshurites" should be read, with Vulgate, Syriac, etc., instead of "Ashurites" in 2Sa 2:9. The only difficulty is that Geshur was an independent kingdom, and there is nothing to show how it was brought under the sway of the son of Saul. In the catalogue of land still to be possessed in Jos 13:2, the King James Version reads "Geshuri," the Revised Version (British and American) "the Geshurites," referring evidently to a district bordering on the Philistines. Both the King James Version and the Revised Version (British and American) render the same word by "Geshurites" in 1Sa 27:8, where apparently the same territory is indicated as invaded by David. In neither passage is the text above suspicion; in 1Sa 27:8 Septuagint's Codex Vaticanus omits the name. No satisfactory explanation has been suggested.

Written by W. Ewing

Smith's Bible Dictionary

Geshur:

(a bridge) a little principality of Syria, northeast of Bashan (Deuteronomy 3:14; 2 Samuel 15:8). It is highly probable that Geshur was a section of the wild and rugged region now called el‐Lejah, still a refuge for criminals and outlaws. SEE [ARGOB].

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The Blue Letter Bible ministry and the BLB Institute hold to the historical, conservative Christian faith, which includes a firm belief in the inerrancy of Scripture. Since the text and audio content provided by BLB represent a range of evangelical traditions, all of the ideas and principles conveyed in the resource materials are not necessarily affirmed, in total, by this ministry.


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