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Dictionaries :: Ring

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Easton's Bible Dictionary

Ring:

Used as an ornament to decorate the fingers, arms, wrists, and also the ears and the nose. Rings were used as a signet (Gen 38:18). They were given as a token of investment with authority (Gen 41:42; Est 3:8-10; 8:2), and of favour and dignity (Luk 15:22). They were generally worn by rich men (Jam 2:2). They are mentioned by Isiah (3:21) among the adornments of Hebrew women.

International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia

Ring:

(Anglo-Saxon, Hring, "ring"): The word renders (the American Standard Revised Version) two Hebrew words (in the King James Version and the English Revised Version three) and two Greek words. Tabba‘ath, the principal Hebrew word, is from Tabha‘, "sink," either because the ring is something "cast" or molded, or, more probably, since the principal use of the ring was as a seal, because it "sank" into the wax or clay that received the impression. In Exodus, Tabba‘ath, "ring," is a detail of furniture or equipment, as the rings of the ark through which the staves were thrust (Ex 25:12, etc.), rings for curtains, in the high priest's ephod (Ex 28:28; 39:21), etc. Its other use was perhaps the original, to describe the article of personal adornment worn on the finger, apparently in the Old Testament always a signet-ring, and as such an indispensable article of masculine attire. Such a ring Pharaoh gave Joseph as a symbol of authority (Ge 41:42); and Ahasuerus gave Haman (Es 3:10); with it the royal missive was sealed (Es 3:12; 8:8 twice, 10). It was also a feminine ornament in Isaiah's list of the fashionable feminine paraphernalia, "the rings and the nose-jewels" (quite likely rings also) (Isa 3:21). Either as ornaments or for their intrinsic value, or both, rings were used as gifts for sacred purposes from both men and women: "brooches, and ear-rings, and signet-rings" (margin "nose-rings") (Ex 35:22); "bracelets, rings (the American Standard Revised Version "signet-rings"), ear-rings" (Nu 31:50 the King James Version). chotham, "signet," mentioned in Ge 38:18,25; Ex 28:11,21,36; Ex 39:6,14,30; Jer 22:24; Hag 2:23, etc., was probably usually a seal ring, but in Ge 38 and elsewhere the seal may have been swung on wire, and suspended by a cord from the neck. It was not only an identification, but served as a stamp for signature. galil, "circle" (compare "Galilee," "Circle" of the Gentiles), rendered "ring" in Es 1:6; So 5:14, may rather mean "cylinder" or "rod" of metal. EARRING (which see) in the King James Version is from totally different words: nezem, whose etymology is unknown, aghil, "round," or lachash, "amulet"; so the Revised Version (British and American). The "rings" of the wheels in Eze 1:18 (the King James Version) are gabh, "curved," and mean "rims" (American Standard Revised Version), "felloes." Egyptians especially wore a great profusion of rings, principally of silver or gold, engraved with scarabaei, or other devices. In the New Testament the ring, daktulios, "finger-ring," is a token of means, position, standing: "put a ring on his hand" (Lu 15:22). Perhaps also it included the right to give orders in his father's name. To be chrusodaktulios, "golden-ringed," perhaps with more than one, indicated wealth and social rank: "a man with a gold ring" (Jas 2:2).

Written by Philip Wendell Crannell

See EARRING

See SIGNET

See SEAL

Vine's Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words
1 Strong's Number: g1146 Greek: daktulios

Ring:

"a finger ring," occurs in Luk 15:22.

Note: Chrusodaktulios, an adjective signifying "with a gold ring," "a gold-ringed (person)," from chrusos, "gold," and daktulos, "a finger," occurs in Jam 2:2.

Smith's Bible Dictionary

Ring:

The ring was regarded as an indispensable article of a Hebrew's attire, inasmuch as it contained his signet. It was hence the symbol of authority (Genesis 41:42; Esther 3:10). Rings were worn not only by men, but by women (Isaiah 3:21). We may conclude from Exodus 28:11 that the rings contained a stone engraven with a device or with the owner's name. The custom appears also to have prevailed among the Jews of the apostolic age (James 2:2).

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The Blue Letter Bible ministry and the BLB Institute hold to the historical, conservative Christian faith, which includes a firm belief in the inerrancy of Scripture. Since the text and audio content provided by BLB represent a range of evangelical traditions, all of the ideas and principles conveyed in the resource materials are not necessarily affirmed, in total, by this ministry.


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